Archive for May, 2014

MAY FATHER VLADIMIR DZIADEK REST IN THE PEACE HE DID NOT HAVE IN THIS LIFE

Wednesday, May 21st, 2014
2014 Remembering the Faithful Departed

Father Vladimir Dziadek

FUNERAL HOMILY FOR FATHER VLADIMIR DZIADEK
St. Joseph Catholic Church, Tampa, FL
Monday, May 18, 2014
Most Reverend Robert N. Lynch, Bishop of St. Petersburg

            There are three things that are for certain in every human life: birth, death and taxes. While we ourselves are responsible for the third, our taxes, our staunchly pro-life teaching has always held and argued that God alone is the author of all human life and God alone is to be the determiner of when life begins and when it ends. Our Father Vladimir, however, a week ago chose both the time and the manner of his departure from our midst and the end of his life. This morning we may think we know of the contributing factors of his decision, but none of us is gifted with the power to see into his mind, his thinking, and his decision-making last Sunday night and Monday morning a week ago. No amount of money is worth the taking of a human life, no amount of shame can ever completely erase the good a person has done, no sin is truly unpardonable, no potential embarrassment even approaches the shame, anger, guilt which befalls those left behind to deal with the unforeseen reality occasioned by suicide. I want everyone here present this morning, the children of the parish and in the school to know that the single act which brings us together this morning is wrong.

            The act, however, can at times be severable from the person. For all of his priestly life, Father Vladimir put himself at the service of the Lord Jesus, serving in missionary territory in Venezuela prior to coming to the United States and to our local Church. In the years he was here, he endeared himself to God’s people. At Most Holy Name of Jesus parish, they cared for him enough that they gave him time to improve his English and when the Church became vacant they asked that he be made their shepherd. He was happy there, serving God’s people and loving in a special way the Hispanic population he was linguistically better prepared to minister to.

            When I asked him three years ago to come to St. Joseph’s to succeed the beloved Father Felix, he did not hesitate. He came. It was not easy for him. There was the school which had been losing money and enrollment for many years and a whole new effort begun by the University of Notre Dame to not just save the school but to build it up. He lived to see that happen. There were walls to be painted in the Church and at times he was more difficult and demanding of the artist painting than Pope Julius was of Michelangelo applying fresco to the Sistine Chapel. Through it all, mostly alone, he heard your confessions, celebrated Mass for you in two languages, baptized your children, and anointed your sick. On two occasions he told Monsignor Morris and I how much he loved St. Joseph parish and that it was an honor to be your pastor. Publicly all seemed well. Internally what some of us knew to be true was that dear Father Vladimir suffered bouts of depression although in recent years he showed signs of improvement and greater control.

            However, little known to most and unknown to me, there was an affliction within him called an addiction, which first came to light less than two weeks ago.  Addictions are not always sinful. To be sinful, in classic moral theology, three things are necessary: grave matter (taking a loaf of bread from the super market to feed one’s starving family, though I do not recommend it, is not grave matter but taking large sums of money is); second, one must know and understand the gravity of the act (since addictive behavior is often repetitive behavior, this requirement for serious sin can sometimes be missing); third and finally, in performing the sinful act one must willfully and knowingly intend  to break God’s law and the harmonious relationship between ourselves and our God and fellow women and men.

            Neither you nor I this morning are in a position to judge Father’s actions. He did not give us a chance to do so. But all three readings from Scripture remind us that our God is merciful, loving, compassionate and forgiving. The task of judgment passes from our minds and hands to Our Lord’s. Less than fifty years ago, a funeral Mass for a victim of suicide was not allowed by our Church and priests were not even allowed to pray over the caskets of the dead. The Church and society have embraced the notion that mental illness often causes people to do the unexplainable and what was once considered a capital sin remains wrong but can be an occasion for mercy, a call to pardon, a sign of love. We gather this morning not as investigative reporters but people of faith.

            Allow me to speak just for myself for just a moment. The past week has seen my emotions run the gamut from anger to guilt, from disbelief to compassionate concern for Father’s family in Poland and in West Tampa, from shame to sorrow, and usually back to guilt. On Saturday morning I rejoiced at the ordination of our three new priests, but I could not rid myself of the image of “the one who got away and how I wished I could have taken him back.” And I am sure that many of you have shared the same thoughts and the same feelings. A leader of belief, a shepherd of souls, a model of Christian living and loving, chose to end his life and leave the rest to us.

            Now we must leave the rest to God. There is no reason why we can not remember Father for all the good that he has done but there is no reason why we could or should embrace the manner in which he chose to leave us. Hoping and praying that he died in the Lord, we can embrace the words of the writer of the Book of Revelation, “Yes. . .let [him] find rest from [his] labors, for [his] works accompany [him]. Rev.14.13. As Wisdom says in the first reading: He who pleased God was loved; he who lived among sinners was transported, snatched away, less wickedness pervert his mind or deceit beguile his soul.  For the witchery of paltry things obscures what is right, and the whirl of desire transforms the innocent mind.” Wis.4:11-13.

            It is my duty as your bishop to assure you that we can pray for Father Vladimir confident that God will judge him justly. It is also my duty to draw the distinctions between right and wrong and in a proper time and manner to share with you what I know when I know it about what has and can be done to right the wrong, which was done. But it is also my duty as your bishop to say to Father Vladimir and to his family, despite all this, we are grateful for his better times and better moments among us and we send you our love and sympathy as we commend his soul to God, the most high. Eternal rest grant unto you, Vladimir, and may perpetual light shine upon you.

Father Vladimir Dziadek endeavored to be a good man and a good priest. Prior to coming to the United States, he left his native Poland and served for seven years in the missions of Venezuela.  In 2002, he came to the Diocese of St. Petersburg, able to speak perfect Spanish while perfecting his English. After a few years as an Assistant Pastor at Most Holy Name of Jesus Parish in Gulfport, he was named Pastor of the same parish in 2009 with the support of many parishioners. He was loved at that parish and when I asked him to assume the leadership of St. Joseph Parish in West Tampa, he readily agreed, was missed by the community in Gulfport, and began to bring people, mostly Hispanic Catholics back to St. Joseph’s. He was a good shepherd.

Two weeks ago, our Executive Director of Finance visited St. Joseph Parish because there appeared to him to be a significant lessening of support and an interesting, albeit alarming reduction in the balance sheet of the parish. It did not take long for him to discover that the pastor had been using the parish bank debit card to withdraw large sums of money at the local gambling casino over the last fifteen months. Father Vladimir readily acknowledged that he had withdrawn the money for gambling purposes but stated that he had tried to replace some of the funds.

The next day Monsignor Robert Morris, our Vicar General,  and I met with Father Vladimir and it was clear that the situation was far more serious than even thought the day prior. After a preliminary inspection of the accounts of the parish during the three years that Father had been pastor, it appears that  $199,685.00 was taken for the purpose of gambling and  $35,300.00 had been returned to the parish. This otherwise good priest appeared to have a serious addiction to gambling. I assured Father Vladimir that I was ready to help him in any way I or the diocese possibly could. Father Vladimir left my office ashamed of what he had done, sorry for what he had done, but in denial in some ways of the true nature of his actions.  I immediately removed Father Vladimir from anything involving administration of St. Joseph Parish. I assured  him that I was ready to assist him in any way possible, asked him to allow us to find assistance for him for his addiction (which he continued to deny having) and that while I hated the circumstances in which we found ourselves, I still loved him as a bishop should and we would attempt to get through what was coming. Monsignor Morris and I were concerned before his arrival in our office of his emotional stability. He had a history of fighting with deep depression, once which required hospitalization and a lengthy leave of absence in Poland to work on recovery. Both of us asked him not to return to the Rectory that night and be alone but to stay with either of us. He refused, insisting that he would be all right. The next day I ask a brother priest who was also Polish to call him up and ask him to move in with him and again he refused. There were several phone contacts with Father Vladimir which followed.

Concerning the funds taken from St. Joseph Parish, all institutions of the diocese are insured against such losses but the insurance carrier rightly demands that appropriate law enforcement be notified. In cases such as this, priests are not treated differently from lay employees. I met with the Diocesan Finance Council and sought the advice as well of Legal Counsel for the diocese.

Last Monday morning, May 12th, I was terribly saddened to learn that Father Vladimir had taken his own life.  The pain that has been felt by parish staff members, parishioners, friends, family members, fellow priests and myself is immeasurable.  I went immediately to the parish, to speak with staff members and have cooperated with the investigators from the Tampa Police Department.

I have chosen to appoint Father Carlos Rojas as Administrator of St. Joseph Parish.  Father Rojas is an energetic young priest of our diocese with a passionate heart for ministry.  I am confident that he can and will bring much-needed healing to the parish community of St. Joseph’s.

The parish turn-out for his viewing and Wake Service on Sunday was “standing-room only” for three hours. At his funeral on Monday, they were standing in the back half of the Church as there were not enough seats. Sixty-five of his brother priests came for the funeral Mass. The parish community knew everything by the week-end, except the exact amounts I have shown above since the local media had reported the story. They came to forgive, to mourn, and to ask divine mercy on a man whom they loved in life. On Monday night after the funeral I met with about twenty leaders of the parish community and told them everything which I knew, including not just the amounts taken and replaced but the pattern of financially accounting for them as well. All monies missing will be quickly reimbursed to St. Joseph’s parish.  Sadly, the parish did not have an active, fully functioning, fully accountable Finance Council; it met seldom and usually were just used to sign reports required of the diocese. That changed at St. Joseph as of Monday night. This morning I said Mass for the school children and spoke to them at length about “heaven”.

This has been the hardest, most challenging and emotionally draining moment of my time here as bishop. Father Joseph Waters, the Rector of St. Jude Cathedral upon learning of the suicide and reasons texted me this message: “suicide leaves behind many victims.” He was so spot on. I have celebrated the funerals for three suicide victims in my priestly life, all teen-agers. I then had no real sense of the deep feelings of guilt and anger and questioning which those three families experienced, until now. I blame myself and even though everyone who loves me says, “don’t”, to this moment I can’t stop. I feel I could have and should have done more. This all transpired on the Sunday when the Gospel said that the good shepherd would leave the ninety-nine to reclaim the one.

I end as I began. Father Vladimir was a good man who made some very serious errors in judgment, yet had a deep love for Christ and the people of his Church. Please join me in praying for his eternal rest and for the people of St. Joseph Parish who will miss him terribly.

+RNL

THREE NEW “LINEMEN”

Monday, May 19th, 2014

In a week which witnessed this writer on an emotional roller-coaster, Saturday was a beautiful day of rejoicing and being glad.

Somehow, with God’s help, I squeezed the ordination of three new priests and two weddings into the daylight hours. Our Cathedral of St. Jude, newly remodeled, was the scene for the ordination as well as one of the weddings and the new space works magnificently.

Filled to over-flowing, the ordination ceremony is certainly the most beautiful liturgy at which any bishop presides. You can relive the two-hour and twenty-minute ceremony by watching the archived “livestream” replay of the ordination ceremony by clicking here.

Should you not wish to watch the whole ceremony, you may look at a few photos that I am including below (see more photos by clicking here). You may also read my homily on the occasion which is included below the photos (click here for a PDF version of my homily). However, if you wish to merely listen to the homily and neither watch it nor read it, that too is possible by clicking here. Isn’t technology amazing?

Deacons Jonathan Emery, Fabiszewski and Kyle Smith processing in at the beginning of Mass. Photo kindness of Maria Mertens.

Deacons Jonathan Emery, Brian Fabiszewski and Kyle Smith processing in at the beginning of Mass. Photo kindness of Maria Mertens.

 

The Cathedral of St. Jude the Apostle was full for this glorious occasion. Photo kindness of Maria Mertens.

The Cathedral of St. Jude the Apostle was full for this glorious occasion. Photo kindness of Maria Mertens.

 

Litany of Supplication (Saints).

Litany of Saints. Photo kindness of Mike Donovan.

Laying on of Hands upon Deacon Kyle Smith. Photo kindness of Mike Donovan.

Laying on of Hands upon Deacon Kyle Smith. Photo kindness of Mike Donovan.

Anointing the hands of Father Brian Fabiszewski with the sacred Chrism. Photo kindness of Mike Donovan.

Anointing the hands of Father Brian Fabiszewski with the sacred Chrism. Photo kindness of Mike Donovan.

Greeting Father Jonathan Emery during the "Kiss of Peace". Photo kindness of Mike Donovan.

Greeting Father Jonathan Emery during the “Kiss of Peace”. Photo kindness of Mike Donovan.

The new fathers at their seats among the priests while the congregation spontaneously applauds. Photo kindness of Mike Donovan.

The new fathers at their seats among the priests while the congregation spontaneously applauds. Photo kindness of Mike Donovan.

Liturgy of the Eucharist. Photo kindness of Maria Mertens.

Liturgy of the Eucharist. Photo kindness of Maria Mertens.

Father Brian Fabszewski, Father Jonathan Emery, myself, and Father Kyle Smith after their ordination to the priesthood. Photo kindness of Maria Mertens.

Father Brian Fabszewski, Father Jonathan Emery, myself, and Father Kyle Smith after their ordination to the priesthood. Photo kindness of Maria Mertens.

Ordinations to the Priesthood
Saturday, May 17, 2014
Most Reverend Robert N. Lynch, Bishop of St. Petersburg
Cathedral of St. Jude the Apostle
Acts 10:37-43; Ephesians 4:1-7, 11-13; John 15:9-17

            Barely nine days ago, much of the attention of the nation seemed to be directed toward the annual National Football League draft. Countless commentators spouting off on who might be chosen first, second, and third in the draft all listed the following requisites: height, weight, size. This morning the Church of St. Petersburg’s annual “draft day” has all that going for it and far more.

For these three men there was no suspense about whether or not their names would be called; there certainly was no “money sign” given by any of the three a few moments ago when we signaled our pleasure at their generosity, courage and determination, and in thirty to forty minutes, each of these men will “don” our equivalent of the “team jersey” – the chasuble worn at Mass.

            Our new “offensive linemen” will not get monetarily rich either. Their agent, St. Paul, in lieu of telling them how much their life and talent is worth in worldly terms, instead “urged [them] to live in a manner worthy of the call you have received, with all humility and gentleness, with patience, bearing with one another through love, striving to preserve the unity of the Spirit through the bond of peace.” Clearly this isn’t the football of Vince Lombardi. This is the priesthood of Jesus Christ.

            In our world, love trumps violence. These men came today with excellent coaching: by their parents, by the example of priests they came to know and admire; by women and men in formation who shaped their vision of vocation and service. They did not have to first go to Indianapolis, to try out, prior to being called. Brian, Jonathan and Kyle’s calls came much earlier in their lines, as we heard moments ago in the Gospel, “it was not you who chose me, but I who chose you and appointed you to go and bear fruit that will remain. . . .This I command you: love one another.” Quietly, humbly, patiently, persistently, presently, fully and completely, these three men are in a very real way laying down their lives for the friends of Jesus.

            And when they might wish to be watching football on a Saturday afternoon, they will more likely sit in the dim light of the confessional waiting for that someone who has not darkened the door of the same for years to arrive seeking the reassurance of God’s mercy and compassion.

          When they might wish to be watching football on a Sunday afternoon or spending time with their family at both the end and the beginning of a long week, they will instead be pouring the water of new life over the head of a child screaming as if he or she wants God in heaven to know that they are free of original sin, the devil’s grasp and now here present, in His Church.

          And in that daily split-second of Divine accomplishment when the bread and the wine, the body and blood of the Lord is raised aloft at the words of institution, at the Great Amen, or at the invitation to receive the Body and Blood of Christ, all eyes and all light will focus on the Eucharistic Lord, not the person of the celebrant. It’s a whole new world. It’s a whole new way of loving. It’s a whole new manner of self-giving. It’s not about us, no matter how long we have been waiting for the moment. It’s all about Jesus and his love for us. We cannot give what we do not have but what we have to share is worth spending the rest of our lives for.

           Today, then, is not draft day. Jesus took care of that nine years ago, or seven years ago when these men first entered the seminary. And today is not the Super Bowl either, for that moment of glory in the sun is all too fleeting. Luke’s words, quoting Peter in the first reading from Acts, capture the essence of this moment perfectly as he reminds us of: how God anointed Jesus of Nazareth with the Holy Spirit and power.

            So Brian, Kyle and Jonathan, after invoking on you the assistance of the saints, laying my hands joined by those of the presbyters on your heads, and anointing your hands with the same Holy Spirit and power, you shall take your place at the altar of God. It’s absolutely amazing. After multiple years of preparing for, dreaming about, working hard for this moment, it will be over very quickly. But a wonderful, rich lifetime of ministry is only just beginning. Priesthood is more than just a moment. It is a way of life.

          Everything that the NFL, major league baseball, the New York Times and CNN or Fox and the media in general think are the true markers of success in life are merely passing idols. For you and me, for your brother priests, Jesus Christ is the constant and like him, as Pope Francis constantly reminds us, we must be humble, gentle, patient, forbearing messengers of his presence. Today and perhaps even tomorrow you and I are dressed in our finest. These are signs of celebrations, of a festive occasion but they are not what Christ would have worn today. We earn our stripes which identify who we are and what we do not by what we wear but how and to whom we minister.

            Brian and Kyle, please give me just a moment for a special word to Jonathan. Many here present today do not know that from the second to the sixth year of my priesthood I served as Rector/President of St. John Vianney College Seminary in Miami. For two of those five years I had a student named Robert Emery, Jonathan’s Dad. He was a larger man than even his son and at times he was even larger than life. He could be a handful. But Bob Emery was at his best when he was on his knees in the chapel and at prayer, often asking God if he should continue in the seminary perhaps not putting up with the likes of me. After I left St. John Vianney, he left the priestly pursuit and we did not meet again until twelve years later when I confirmed Jonathan and he told me, “this one has a true vocation.” I have thought about your Dad, bigger “Bob”, a lot these last couple of days, Jonathan, and I know he could not be prouder of this moment and the other good things which have happened to his family following his sudden, unexpected death seven years ago. I truly sense a presence among us this morning, a twelfth player, if you will, very proud for sure, but telling his son, it’s past time to get on with the rest of your life.

            Three great men present themselves to the Church today. But we reaffirm that there is, “one Lord, one faith; one baptism; one God and Father of all, who is over all and through all and in all.” This you can take to the bank: rejoice and be glad for this is the day the Lord has made!

Newly ordained celebrate what is somewhat inaccurately called their “First Mass” following the ordination rite and normally on the next day, Sunday. Father Kyle Smith left the cathedral, went home for a few minutes, and then was off to his parish church, Our Lady of the Rosary for his Mass on Saturday afternoon.

Father Kyle Smith celebrating his first Mass at his home parish of Our Lady of the Rosary in Land O' Lakes. Photo kindness of Ron Ludwin.

Father Kyle Smith celebrating his first Mass at his home parish of Our Lady of the Rosary in Land O’ Lakes. Photo kindness of Ron Ludwin.

 

Father Kyle Smith celebrating his first Mass at his home parish of Our Lady of the Rosary in Land O' Lakes. Photo kindness of Ron Ludwin.

Father Kyle Smith celebrating his first Mass at his home parish of Our Lady of the Rosary in Land O’ Lakes. Photo kindness of Ron Ludwin.

Click here to see more photos from Father Kyle Smith’s first Mass at Our Lady of the Rosary Parish.

I did the same thing thirty-six years ago, having been ordained on the Saturday just prior to Pentecost and managed to get everything out of the way by sunset on the day of ordination itself. The other two priests celebrated their Masses on Sunday. Truth to tell, they actually concelebrate their first Mass with their bishop following the ordination rite itself but we all know what they mean when they invite you to their “First Mass of Thanksgiving.”

Father Jonathan Emery celebrating his first Mass at his home parish of St. Clement in Plant City. Photo kindness of Carol Rodriguez.

Father Jonathan Emery celebrating his first Mass at his home parish of St. Clement in Plant City. Photo kindness of Carol Rodriguez.

 

Father Jonathan Emery celebrating his first Mass at his home parish of St. Clement in Plant City. Photo kindness of Carol Rodriguez.

Father Jonathan Emery celebrating his first Mass at his home parish of St. Clement in Plant City. Photo kindness of Carol Rodriguez.

Click here to see more photos from Father Jonathan Emery’s first Mass at St. Clement Parish in Plant City.

Father Brian Fabiszewski celebrating his First Mass at his home parish of St. Catherine of Siena in Clearwater. Photo kindness of Wayne Clegg.

Father Brian Fabiszewski celebrating his First Mass at his home parish of St. Catherine of Siena in Clearwater. Photo kindness of Wayne Clegg.

 

Father Brian Fabiszewski celebrating his First Mass at his home parish of St. Catherine of Siena in Clearwater. Photo kindness of Wayne Clegg.

Father Brian Fabiszewski celebrating his First Mass at his home parish of St. Catherine of Siena in Clearwater. Photo kindness of Wayne Clegg.

Click here to see more photos from Father Brian Fabiszewski’s first Mass at St. Catherine of Siena Parish in Clearwater.

So now they are priests and are given some time to relax between seminary, ordination day, and reporting for their first assignment. The faithful parishioners of St. Cecilia, Our Lady of the Rosary, and Most Holy Redeemer will now have the task of “breaking them in” as their associate pastors and I am sure that these three communities, led by loving and hard-working pastors, will see to it.

But it will still be some days before the applause of gratitude and affirmation dies down in their memories, the love and pride of their families diminishes once again in commands to clear the family table or dry the dishes, or do your own laundry, the joy of their brothers already in priestly ministry subsides. Saturday was a great day for the ordained, for their families and friends, and for their bishop who badly needed such a wonderful moment. (Apropos of the difficulties of last week, please watch this space the next several days as I attempt in homiletic form and information source to share with you what I know and believe relative to the death of Father Vladimir Dziadek).

The country singer Glen Campbell, back in the age of dinosaurs when I was growing up, sang a song called “Wichita Lineman” which began with these words, “I am a lineman for the county. .  . .” Our three new priests are “linemen for Christ” and we wish them many happy, wonderful years of playing in the “big leagues” of ministry and service.

+RNL

ENOUGH ALREADY

Thursday, May 1st, 2014
St. John Paul II

St. John Paul II

The great canonization week-end is over and life in Rome is getting back to something approaching “Rome normal.” I have some thoughts about the canonizations which I would like to share with you as well as some thoughts about what some others have said subsequently about the events and those canonized.

Regular readers of this blog will recall that at the time Pope Francis announced his intention to canonize both Popes John XXIII and John Paul II at the same time, forgoing the need for a second miracle in the case of the former, I thought it was a brilliant offensive and defensive move on the part of our Holy Father.

Close followers of Church life have known for some time that there has been a deep chasm between a relatively small group of Catholics who liked nothing about the Second Vatican Council and blamed Pope John XXIII for their problems and another slightly larger but still small group that felt that the Church had stepped back and in some cases away from the vision of the Council fathers, and they blamed Pope John Paul II for their problems with the Church today. The former group is growing apoplectic about the present Pope and the latter group is growing impatient with him and could also move to the apoplectic if he does not act more quickly to embrace their hopes and aspirations. Relative to two of his predecessors, Francis moved decisively, congruently and cogently to share the best of both men’s lives with the Church at the same time and his measured, thoughtful homily on the occasion of their canonization last Sunday did not overdo either man. For this bishop, Pope Francis continues to never disappoint.

This brings me to my second point.

St. John XXIII

St. John XXIII

Two popes were canonized at the same time but in the eyes of too many people, I think, for the wrong reason. Saints are declared by the Church to be so because of who they were as persons and not what office they held. I have no personal experience of being in the presence of Saint Pope John XXIII but I have a lot more experience of being in the presence of Saint Pope John Paul II than a lot of other people in this country, including many bishops. I had the privilege and honor of planning and executing his 1979 and 1987 visits to the United States and being in over-all charge of the episcopal conference’s daily operations when he returned for World Youth Day in November. I was in the presence of Pope John Paul II when he came down in Boston on his first morning in the US in his pajamas for coffee and witnessed his nightly departure for bed and rest. But what I recall the most was the man at prayer. He was a mystic, able to communicate with his God at the deepest level of the mystical experience of prayer. One night we lost him temporarily at the residence where he was staying, only to find him prostrate on the floor of the chapel in a deep mystical experience. He was a saintly man and that reason and that reason alone should have advanced his cause. However, he was also a pope for a long time and if it were to be the position one holds which provides a fast track to canonization, this one took place too quickly for there is much to be discovered about his papacy overall.

I raise this concern because the cause of Pope Paul VI is rumored to be moving quite quickly also and a first miracle is said to be soon attributed to him. I loved Pope Paul VI and genuinely believe my own priestly vocation might be attributed to him but at some point we need to press the pause button and let more time elapse between the death of a pope and his canonization or history can ultimately make the Church look quite foolish (remember Galileo?). It can seem that it is the position, the papacy, that is the stepping stone to sainthood and not necessarily the person.

My third and final point centers on an article which I read today by a long-time friend and former colleague of mine, Francis Butler, who wonders in print, where are all the lay people in the canonization queue? Does one have to wear a cassock or habit to qualify for consideration? It is a very fair point.

On numerous occasions as the currently unavailable files from my time as General Secretary of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (then the NCCB/USCC) where notes were taken of the meetings of my President and Vice-President with Saint Pope John Paul II, one will find several times the Holy Father asked our Conference to look for married couples as well as lay men and women who might be worthy of consideration. I think he knew that the sanctity scale was tilted strongly in the direction of priests and religious and was extremely desirous of elevating more laity to the ranks of sainthood.

We have now in the United States a candidate in the person of Dorothy Day who was from all accounts a very holy woman, even a saintly woman. That cause has been introduced by our episcopal conference, but. . . .now she will probably need to await the two miracles.

My final thought raises the question in my mind and I hope you will consider it as well, what is more important – seemingly miraculous occurences attributed to a holy person or the known sanctity of the person themselves?

Pope Francis has been moving toward the latter, eliminating the need at least for a second miracle. Maybe, just maybe, it is time to take a look at the whole process and eliminate the miracles necessity. That might open up the pool of potential saints beyond “cassocks and habits” and make it clear once again that it is the indeed the personal life of holiness which is the qualifier, not the position in the church occupied or held. Just a thought!

+RNL